Fear Factory Guitarist Dino Cazares Discusses Making ‘The Industrialist’

By Andrew Bansal

After welcoming guitarist Dino Cazares back into the band and putting out a successful seventh studio album, Mechanize, in early 2010, modern metal giants Fear Factory have returned.

Their follow-up album, The Industrialist, is ready to release early next month. This conceptual record also features bassist Matt DeVries, who replaced Byron Stroud.

I caught up with Cazares on May 15 to discuss the making of the album, lineup changes and his gear setup. Read the conversation below, and check out Fear Factory’s Facebook page for up-to-date info on the album and the band’s tour dates.

Your new album, The Industrialist, is coming out June 5, and it’s supposed to be a concept album. What’s that all about, and how did you guys decide to do a concept album?

Well, we’ve always been doing concept records ever since the early days, from Demanufacture, Obselete, Digimortal and so on, but this time we decided to take it a little bit further. We’ve always been presenting the concept of man versus technology and man versus machine. The past records have been about the perspective of the human, but this one is about the automaton, which is a robot.

The concept is about his perception, what the automaton sees, what he feels and what he learns. He’s basically a robot that collects memories and stores them. He’s fighting for his life, and for other automatons. We as humans built the automaton to help us for everyday life, but he basically turns against humans. And that’s what the story is about.

Do you think the music also is a story in itself, as in, the songs are linked to each other?

They are roughly linked to each other, yes. Burton wrote the whole story to fit with the order of the songs. So they are linked together. Musically I believe I tried to capture the soundtrack of what I saw visually in my head. I tried to write the soundtrack to the story. That’s basically what the album does.

The previous album, Mechanize, was your first album since your return to the band. This one is coming out almost exactly two years after that. Would you say it was easier for you to write this one, because you’ve been with the band for a couple of years?

Well, every project I worked on, I’ve tried to put as much as I possibly can. I dedicate myself to the project, and nothing really is too difficult for me. There are times where we go through small periods of writer’s block, but for me, I don’t really go through that too much. So it comes pretty quickly. Me and Burton started Fear Factory in 1999, so Fear Factory is in me. Every other band that I play in, you can hear my style, and you can hear Fear Factory in everything I do. So, this record was easy, not easier than the last record.

Head to GuitarWorld.com to read the rest of this interview.

Andrew Bansal is a Los Angeles-based writer who has been running his own website, Metal Assault, since early 2010, and has been prolific in covering the hard rock and heavy metal scene by posting interviews, reviews and pictures on his website — with the help of a small group of people. Besides being hugely passionate about heavy metal, he is an avid follower of jazz music and recently started a blog called Jazz Explorer to pursue that interest.

 

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  • Iamknownasmillertime

    Started the band in 1999?  I think not.

  • Onefinecat

    actually- he did- so want to argie it

  • Onefinecat

    argue?