The Complete Interview: Hot Chicks in Hard Rock Heidi Sheperd and Carla Harvey of Butcher Babies

When we interviewed Heidi Sheperd and Carla Harvey of Butcher Babies for the new Hottest Chicks in Hard Rock issue (See page 56), we discussed several topics, including their new EP and what life was like for the high school versions of themselves.

Unfortunately, due to space constraints, we couldn’t include most of the interview. But that’s what the Internet is for! Read what they have to say below!

REVOLVER: What’s new in Butcher Babies land?

HEIDI: We are very excited to be jetting off on a nationwide tour with Otep. Touring with Otep is something we consider a dream come true because she helped pave the way for other females in metal.

CARLA: We just got back from our first European tour, which was highlighted by playing the Download festival. We’ve got our first EP out finally, and we’re about to head out on a national tour with Otep.

What’s your favorite song on your new EP and why?

HEIDI: I’m obsessed with “Axe Wound.” This is a song we worked really hard on for a long time. We took a lot of different elements from different types of metal and squished them all into one song. Plus, for me, I get to sing as well as scream.

CARLA: My favorite song on the EP is “Jesus Needs More Babies for His War Machine.” It’s just straightforward metal that makes you want drive 100 mph on the freeway, and it’s got a great message.

Since this is also our “back to school” issue, some school-related questions: How would you describe your school experience?

HEIDI: School for me was always awkward. I grew up in Provo, Utah, where everyone is very strong in the Mormon religion. Even my family was incredibly religious. But I never fit in with the beliefs and rules of the church. In school, however, I found a way to focus on to other things that exercised my creativity rather than fitting in with the mold of the typical Mormon child. Such as music, video production, creative writing and radio. In college, I was little more “free” to be myself and really express who I am.

CARLA: I loved college. I went to mortuary school and studied embalming, chemistry, anatomy, pathology, etc. But middle school and high school were pretty awful. People are insecure with themselves at that age, so they go out of their way to make sure others are insecure and miserable as well. I was very different looking and I didn’t play in to what people wanted me to be. I got a lot of shit for that.

What kind of student were you? A nerd or a troublemaker or somewhere in between?

HEIDI: Being what they considered a “wild child” or a little bit different, I was always the kid who got in trouble for saying the “F” word in the halls. Other than that, I just focused more on my sports and music. I think that my teachers actually appreciated that I saw things a little bit differently than the rest.

CARLA: I was half nerd, half troublemaker. I got great grades, but I was bored and needed stimulation, which resulted in a lot of … illicit activity.

What’s the worst trouble you got into while in school?

HEIDI: I was also a cheerleader for the last two years of high school. And during a basketball game against our rival high school, the Thunderbirds, I had smuggled a chicken into the stadium to let loose during one of the timeouts. This was a ritual at our high school, and the principle had warned the students that if anyone was caught with the chicken, they’d be immediately expelled. That didn’t scare me, so I inevitably let the chicken loose. The chicken got loose, ran onto the floor, got scared, shit everywhere and after the game I GOT CAUGHT! Luckily, I learned how to sweet talk the higher-ups and was only sentenced to detention.

CARLA: I used to write and draw dirty comics about the people who gave me shit in my Catholic high school (including the nuns and principal) and tape them up in the hallways. Needless to say, I wasn’t welcome back there and I switched to public school my sophmore year.

Did you ever skip school due to hard rock or metal?

HEIDI: If I was having a bad day, I would pop my headphones in my Discman and drive around listening to Slipknot, Korn, Limp Bizkit, Marilyn Manson, etc.

CARLA: I was in a band senior year in high school, and my attendance level went way down. I still got good grades because I knew it was important to get that degree, that piece of paper. But I also knew there were bigger things out there for me that I wasn’t going to learn in high school.

Did you ever have any run-ins with bullies?

HEIDI: The only “bullies” I had to deal with were mostly girls — the “popular” girls that I had to deal with because I was also a cheerleader but not nearly as cool or pretty. They did everything they could to make things really hard and awkward for me. I do believe, however, that these girls shaped the strong woman I am today. When no one else believed in me, I chose to believe in myself.

CARLA: I was bullied relentlessly because I was a half-black kid growing up in a racially divided city (Detroit) that had an affinity for rock and roll. I was different, and people didn’t get me, so they made fun of me. I didn’t let it change who I was. I didn’t care about being popular. I never understood people who cared so much about being popular for the snapshot in time we call high school. Life gets so much more amazing than high school.

Did music help you get through school? If so, how?

HEIDI: Music helped me get through everything: school, family, religion, etc. I grew up in a very cookie-cutter world, and music allowed me to see outside the tiny box I lived in. I could see the creativity that was waiting for me to grab by the horns and get the hell out of that bubble.

CARLA: I felt pretty alienated in school, so music was everything to me. I never felt alone as long as I had my favorite albums to keep me company. It’s a powerful thing when you hear someone address the problems YOU have in THEIR songs; it makes you feel like you’re not so alone in the world.

 

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  • Cruedude

    At times sounds like old school BITCH.